Acupuncture

Dealing With Fraidy Cats

Animals are more sensitive to weird weather than humans, so they’ll sense a storm is brewing long before you. Don’t freak. When you do, they probably will, too.

Dogs often are more aware of weather changes than other animals. That’s because their olfactory cortex (the part of the brain that analyzes smells) is 40 times larger than a human’s. That means the slightest change in air quality can alert dogs to danger. Canines also are far more sensitive to shifts in barometric pressure, so Fido might experience storm-related anxiety long before the weatherman makes predictions.

If your pet gets skittish during downpours, thunder bumpers and lightening storms, create a “safe zone” inside your home. Maybe a crate, a small room in the center of the house or a basement corner, where storms or less noticeable. Wherever it is, distract your pet from the commotion, especially excitable animals like dogs. Close the blinds; turn on the TV or radio, but not too loudly, and make your friend as comfortable as possible. Give him a blanket and a favorite chew toy. Feel free to leave the room, but don’t leave your pet stranded. Feed him regularly, play with him, reassure him and reward him for staying calm. But don’t coddle too much. Seriously. He’ll pick up on your pandering and wig out. Try to act as though everything is business as usual. And when it truly is, take the dog outdoors. Even if the storm wasn’t a big deal to you, it might have been for your pet.

Animals can often become aggressive or defensive after storms, as they sense that their territory has been invaded. Be patient and monitor your pets’ behaviors until you’re sure they can be unleashed.

By |August 28th, 2014|Acupuncture, Senior Pet Care, Uncategorized|Comments Off on Dealing With Fraidy Cats|

Pet Owners Get the Point

Americans spend more each year on Fido and Fluffy than on booze, bread and everyday pantry staples.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the average U.S. pet owner spent $502 on feathered, furred and fishy friends in 2012. That’s more than the $456 the average person paid for alcohol in one year or the $404 they spent on men’s and boy’s clothing. Pet food alone costs the average household $183 — more than most folks spend on chicken, cereal, bread and candy.

So to all who scoffed at the idea of a veterinary practice emphasizing animal acupuncture, massage and house calls, you can stop laughing now. The odds are tilted in favor of Acupet Wellness and Dr. Mandy DuBose.

The latest numbers underscore just how much people in the U.S. think of their pets. Collectively, they spent nearly $53 billion on them in 2012. That’s an all-time high and the first time in history that more than $50 billion has gone to dogs, cats, canaries, guppies, reptiles and every critter in between, according the American Pet Products Association, which confirmed the numbers.

That’s a lot of zeros to say the least, and the $6.2 billion that went toward grooming and treats last year is more than Facebook made in advertising revenue. The numbers speak volumes. Not even the brutal economy of the past few years has reversed the trend of spending on pets. The totals have risen every year right through the Great Recession.

Dr. DuBose hopes the APPA is accurately predicting a climb of at least 4 percent for 2013, particularly in her niche market — referred to as alternative pet care — which totaled about $12.5 billion last year.

If you thought services like acupuncture were hoity-toity […]

By |October 5th, 2013|Acupuncture, Uncategorized|Comments Off on Pet Owners Get the Point|